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"A PERSON THAT SAVED AT LEAST ONE LIFE WAS NOT BORN FOR NOTHING"

Museum of mountain search and rescue


Welcome to my museum of touristic, mountaineering, skiing and rescue equipment that I have been collecting throughout much of my life.

My collection is in a form of a permanent exhibition that can be also called a Museum of Search and Rescue, Tourism and Mountain Sports. It had not been created by authorities or institutions but by myself, because I felt the need to do so.

Maybe that's also a genetic influence of my maternal great-uncle, Seweryn Udziela, who devoted his whole life to collecting pieces of folk art that he presented in the Ethnographic Museum in Krakow that he created and bequeathed to the Polish society. Today the museum bears his name...

I think I just wanted to preserve the past times, just as he did...

That's how it is – the world moves forward, leaving behind what's old and outworn. That's how progress is made. But at the same time that's how we forget the traditional things, such as old skis, ice axes, ropes and backpacks...


       


 

The museum is devoted to the history of mountain search and rescue in Europe, which is already a 1000 years old. It shows the first rescuers – monks from the St Bernard Pass and their followers. It also presents the development of skiing and mountaineering. It's a place where you can see the authentic clothing of rescuers from the beginnings of the 20th century, their equipment, rescue toboggans and hemp climbing ropes. You can also learn about incredible guerrillas (Tatra Mountains Messengers) who, during the WWII, were the link between the Polish underground forces and the government on emigration, thanks to their dangerous treks through the Tatra Mountains...

A realistic Mountain Rescue station from the 70s will enable you to fell like in the past and you will be able to understand the rescuers' working conditions then. You will compare a rescuer struggling to save his patient in a snowstorm dressed in a woollen sweater and one dressed in Gore-Tex and fleece, with modern touring skis, snowmobiles, quads, resuscitation kits and air rescue. Who will have greater chances to succeed?

The exhibits are presented in a chronological order and they help visitors to answer the following question:

Why should we show so much respect to the people who struggled in the mountains many years ago?

What is the link between the developments in skiing or mountaineering and mountain search and rescue?

Why nowadays a person has greater chances of receiving efficient help in the mountains?

During the tour an experienced Mountain rescuer will tell you about the development of mountain sports as well as about some unusual accidents that happened in the mountains or in rocky Jura...


       

 

Why should I put so much effort and money in creating this museum?

Because I saw too often old, wooden skis or leather ski shoes being thrown out, together with the rest of the old equipment that can only be seen in the pictures nowadays. I realised that every piece of such touristic, mountaineering or skiing equipment has its story. Every such piece saw different snow, heard howling of a different wind, exclamations of delight and success, but maybe also screams of people dying in the mountains...

I decided to rescue those old times, captured in canvas backpacks, wooden toboggans, old ice axes...

I invite you to visit the museum.

Contact me to organise a tour with a lecture.

Attention!

Because of technical reasons and for your comfort, a tour is only possible for organised groups who announce their visit with an e-mail and receive a confirmation of the tour date.

1. Górskie Ochotnicze Pogotowie Ratunkowe –Mountain Volunteer Search and Rescue GOPR